Tag Archives: MRSA

Health district looks for funding to control MRSA

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by Paula Levy

BRIDGEWATER – South Shore Health is looking for a little government help to control its MRSA issues.

Over recent months, South Shore Regional Hospital has had two outbreaks of antibiotic-resistant bacteria on its fourth-floor medical unit. In the fall, as many as 20 cases of MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) were confirmed. Earlier this month nine patients were reported to have contracted the bacteria on the same unit.

Chief executive officer Alice Leverman said additional funding is required to install more handwashing sinks on the unit and replace some furniture. The bacteria can be spread from direct contact. Therefore, infection control has also reviewed handwashing protocol with staff to ensure proper procedures are being followed. “It”s a variety of pieces that we need to focus on and always, if we have an event like that, the important thing is to review what you”re doing and what you could be doing better to ensure that, to the fullest extent possible, you can prevent that,” said Ms Leverman.

Ms Leverman also noted that more cleaning staff was required since in addition to direct contact, the bacteria can be spread through contact with contaminated surfaces.

“There are also some additional staffing required that we”ve had to put in place that are over and above our budgeted staffing,” said Ms Leverman. “We”ve sent that forward to the Department of Health for their review and consideration.”

Staphylococcus aureus can be found on healthy people and can get into the body and cause infection. But some bacteria develop a resistance to methicillin and other common antibiotics. MRSA is of concern in a health-care setting because the bacteria poses a risk to patients who have a compromised immune system.

Spokeswoman for South Shore Health Barbara Johnson said the source of an MRSA outbreak can be difficult to identify. MRSA is a concern in health care because patients in hospitals are at a greater risk of developing an infection if they come in contact with the bacteria.

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New York High School Confirms Case of MRSA

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Published October 07, 2011 | NewsCore

MRSA

HAUPPAUGE, N.Y. –  A New York high school put its students on alert Thursday after confirming a case of methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, less than a year after one of its wrestling stars was hospitalized for almost a month with the superbug.

The school district of Hauppauge, a town in Long Island’s Suffolk County, issued a health alert to parents and students on Wednesday, the Long Island Press reported.

“Our district has just been notified that there is a confirmed case of MRSA in the High School,” said a letter from Superintendent Patricia Sullivan-Kriss. “In response to this, the district acted upon protocols developed to help guard against the spread of this bacterial infection including sanitizing instructional areas.”

MRSA is a drug-resistant form of a usually harmless common bacterium which can be deadly when it infects wounds. It is often found in hospitals and can be transmitted through contact sports.

The letter urged parents and guardians to remind students to wash their hands frequently, keep cuts and scrapes clean and avoid contact with other students’ wounds or bandages.

In February, 16-year-old student and wrestler Nick Mauriello spent nearly a month in the hospital after he contracted MRSA and a related bacterial infection called Lemierre’s syndrome, the Long Island Press said.

Click here to read more on this story from the Long Island Press. 

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2011/10/07/new-york-high-school-confirms-case-mrsa/#ixzz1a6jEyAHS

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*Bioni Hygienic provides anti-microbial properties to prevent microbes on the paint film only. The anti-microbial properties do not protect users or others against bacteria, germs or mold spores and do not substitute hygiene measurements and practices.

Come join Bioni USA in Atlanta, Phoenix, & Chicago

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Bioni USA will be at three trade shows to round out the year.  Come join us and ask about our coating solution!

International Dairy Show – Sept. 19th to 21st

Location – Atlanta, Georgia (Booth 320)

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IFMA: International Facility Management Association – Oct. 26th to 27th

Location – Phoenix, Arizona (Booth 1805)

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Process Expo – Nov. 1st to 4th

Location – Chicago, Illinois (Booth 664)

More U.S. Deaths From MRSA Than AIDS

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In 2005, More Than 18,000 Deaths Attributed to MRSA, CDC Reports

WebMD Health News

By Salynn Boyles

Oct. 16, 2007 — It appears that more people in the U.S. now die from the mostly hospital-acquired staph infection MRSA than from AIDS, according to a new report from the CDC.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was responsible for an estimated 94,000 life-threatening infections and 18,650 deaths in 2005, CDC researchers report in the Oct. 17 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.

That same year, roughly 16,000 people in the U.S. died from AIDS, according to CDC figures.

The national estimate is more than double the invasive MRSA prevalence reported by CDC researchers five years earlier, says researcher R. Monina Klevens, DDS, MPH.

“MRSA infections are an important public health problem that can no longer be ignored,” she tells WebMD. “We need to put this higher on our list of priorities.”

Among the highlights from the newly published study:

  • While most invasive MRSA infections could be traced to a hospital stay or some other health care exposure, about 15% of invasive infections occurred in people with no known health care risk.
  • Two-thirds of the 85% of MRSA infections that could be traced to hospital stays or other health care exposures occurred among people who were no longer hospitalized.
  • People over age 65 were four times more likely than the general population to get an MRSA infection. Incidence rates among blacks were twice that of the general population, and rates were lowest among children over the age of 4 and teens.

MRSA Superbug

Known as a superbug because it is resistant to so many antibiotics, MRSA infection is seen most often in patients who have undergone invasive medical procedures or who have weakened immune systems.

Invasive MRSA is a leading cause of potentially life-threatening bloodstream infections, surgical site infections, and pneumonia.

It has been clear for some time that MRSA was a growing problem in the nation’s hospitals and other health care settings, but the extent of the problem at the national level has not been well known.

The CDC researchers analyzed 2005 data on invasive MRSA infections from nine sites across the country to arrive at the national prevalence figures.

Based on their findings, they estimated that for every 100,000 people living in the U.S. there were 32 cases of invasive MRSA in 2005.

An estimated 128 cases occurred for every 100,000 people aged 65 and over.

Infectious disease specialist Elizabeth A. Bancroft, MD, tells WebMD that as the U.S. population ages, rates of invasive MRSA are likely to climb even higher unless the nation’s hospitals, nursing homes, and other high-risk health care settings take steps to limit its spread.

“Hand washing is one of the most important ways to decrease the spread of MRSA in hospitals, but hand washing compliance rates [among health care professionals] are rarely 100%,” she says. “One thing a patient can do to reduce their risk is make sure everyone they come into contact with washes their hands or uses an alcohol hand rub.”

Community-Acquired MRSA

The vast majority of MRSA infections occurring outside of the health care setting are noninvasive. These community-acquired infections generally take the form of skin infections and are more easily treated.

In the CDC study, people with what appeared to be community-acquired invasive MRSA infections had better outcomes than those with health care acquired infections, Klevens tells WebMD.

“Most severe infections are health care related, but that is not to trivialize community-associated infections,” she says. “The vast majority of community infections are noninvasive, but our study shows that invasive MRSA disease does occur in people without established health care risk factors.”

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Palms of Pasadena Hospital

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www.palmspasadena.com

Another Hospital chooses Bioni Hygienic. Plams of Pasadena Hospital in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Approximately 15,000 sq./ft that includes eight operating rooms and eight serialization units were coated with Bioni Hygienic.

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Email – info@Bioni-USA.com

Obama to sign bill to improve nation’s food safety

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Obama to sign bill to improve nation’s food safety

WASHINGTON (AP) — When salmonella-laced peanut products sickened hundreds during a recent scare, President Barack Obama said consumers should be able to have confidence that their government will keep peanut butter-eating children safe — and that included his daughter Sasha.

“That’s what Sasha eats for lunch probably three times a week,” Obama said then. “And you know, I don’t want to have to worry about whether she’s going to get sick as a consequence to having her lunch.”

On Tuesday, Obama is getting a chance to allay people’s fears about the safety of their food. He is set to sign a $1.4 billion overhaul of the food safety system, giving Washington new power to increase inspections at food processing facilities and force companies to recall tainted products.

Congress passed the bill at the end of last year to respond to several serious outbreaks of E. coli and salmonella poisoning in peanuts, eggs and produce in the past few years. The law will be the first major overhaul of the U.S. food safety system since the 1930s.

“It will bring our food safety system into the 21st century, improving health, saving lives and helping Americans feel confident that when they sit down at their dinner table they won’t end up in the hospital,” Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius told reporters Monday during a conference call.

The measure gives the Food and Drug Administration substantial new authority, but the money to carry out the legislation is not guaranteed. Some conservative lawmakers have expressed concern about the five-year cost at a time when cutting federal spending is the Washington mantra in a tight budget environment. Supporters say they intend to push Congress for the full funding.

Rep. Jack Kingston, R-Ga., who hopes to become chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, said that “our food supply is 99.999 percent safe.” Kingston cited recent federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 48 million people — or one in six Americans — are sickened each year by foodborne illnesses. Of that, 180,000 are hospitalized and 3,000 die annually.

Kingston said that, in a country of more than 308 million people, the figures show the FDA is already doing a “very decent job on food safety already.” He questioned giving the agency more money.

“I think we’ll look very carefully at the funding before we support $1.4 billion,” he told The Associated Press in an interview Monday, speaking of Republicans who will control the House when Congress comes back into session Wednesday.

Erik Olson, director of food and consumer safety programs at the Pew Health Group, argued that the health care costs associated with an outbreak of foodborne illness alone run into the tens of billions of dollars — far beyond the cost of putting the new law into place.

“This will save a great deal of money, both for consumers and for the industry,” Olson told reporters on the conference call arranged by the administration.

The new law will require larger farms and food manufacturers to prepare detailed food safety plans and tell the FDA how they are striving to keep their food safe at different stages of production.

It also emphasizes prevention to help stop outbreaks before they happen. The recent salmonella and E. coli outbreaks exposed the FDA’s lack of resources and authority as it struggled to trace and contain the contaminated products.

The agency rarely inspects most food facilities and farms, visiting some about once a decade and others not at all.

Soon after taking office in 2009, Obama promised to make food safety overhaul a priority. At the time, a widespread outbreak of salmonella in peanuts dominated headlines. At least nine people died as a result and hundreds more were sickened.

The bill had broad bipartisan backing in Congress, but it was criticized by advocates of buying locally sourced food and small-farm operators who said the new requirements could force some of them into bankruptcy. Senators eventually agreed to exempt some of those operations from the costly food safety plans required of bigger companies, but that move upset food safety advocates and larger growers.

Those exemptions are in the legislation Obama is signing.

Many major food companies also support the bill, recognizing that safe food is good for business.

The new law would:

—Allow the FDA to order a recall of tainted food. Currently it can only negotiate with businesses for voluntary recalls.

—Require the agency to develop new safety regulations for producers of the highest-risk fruits and vegetables.

—Increase inspections of domestic and foreign food facilities; the riskiest domestic facilities would be inspected every three years.

—Require farms and processors to keep records to help the government trace recalled foods.

The new law would not extend to meat, poultry or processed eggs. Those foods are regulated by the Agriculture Department and are subjected to more rigorous inspections and oversight than foods regulated by the FDA.

Obama to sign bill to improve nation's food safety

Standard
Obama to sign bill to improve nation’s food safety

WASHINGTON (AP) — When salmonella-laced peanut products sickened hundreds during a recent scare, President Barack Obama said consumers should be able to have confidence that their government will keep peanut butter-eating children safe — and that included his daughter Sasha.

“That’s what Sasha eats for lunch probably three times a week,” Obama said then. “And you know, I don’t want to have to worry about whether she’s going to get sick as a consequence to having her lunch.”

On Tuesday, Obama is getting a chance to allay people’s fears about the safety of their food. He is set to sign a $1.4 billion overhaul of the food safety system, giving Washington new power to increase inspections at food processing facilities and force companies to recall tainted products.

Congress passed the bill at the end of last year to respond to several serious outbreaks of E. coli and salmonella poisoning in peanuts, eggs and produce in the past few years. The law will be the first major overhaul of the U.S. food safety system since the 1930s.

“It will bring our food safety system into the 21st century, improving health, saving lives and helping Americans feel confident that when they sit down at their dinner table they won’t end up in the hospital,” Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius told reporters Monday during a conference call.

The measure gives the Food and Drug Administration substantial new authority, but the money to carry out the legislation is not guaranteed. Some conservative lawmakers have expressed concern about the five-year cost at a time when cutting federal spending is the Washington mantra in a tight budget environment. Supporters say they intend to push Congress for the full funding.

Rep. Jack Kingston, R-Ga., who hopes to become chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, said that “our food supply is 99.999 percent safe.” Kingston cited recent federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 48 million people — or one in six Americans — are sickened each year by foodborne illnesses. Of that, 180,000 are hospitalized and 3,000 die annually.

Kingston said that, in a country of more than 308 million people, the figures show the FDA is already doing a “very decent job on food safety already.” He questioned giving the agency more money.

“I think we’ll look very carefully at the funding before we support $1.4 billion,” he told The Associated Press in an interview Monday, speaking of Republicans who will control the House when Congress comes back into session Wednesday.

Erik Olson, director of food and consumer safety programs at the Pew Health Group, argued that the health care costs associated with an outbreak of foodborne illness alone run into the tens of billions of dollars — far beyond the cost of putting the new law into place.

“This will save a great deal of money, both for consumers and for the industry,” Olson told reporters on the conference call arranged by the administration.

The new law will require larger farms and food manufacturers to prepare detailed food safety plans and tell the FDA how they are striving to keep their food safe at different stages of production.

It also emphasizes prevention to help stop outbreaks before they happen. The recent salmonella and E. coli outbreaks exposed the FDA’s lack of resources and authority as it struggled to trace and contain the contaminated products.

The agency rarely inspects most food facilities and farms, visiting some about once a decade and others not at all.

Soon after taking office in 2009, Obama promised to make food safety overhaul a priority. At the time, a widespread outbreak of salmonella in peanuts dominated headlines. At least nine people died as a result and hundreds more were sickened.

The bill had broad bipartisan backing in Congress, but it was criticized by advocates of buying locally sourced food and small-farm operators who said the new requirements could force some of them into bankruptcy. Senators eventually agreed to exempt some of those operations from the costly food safety plans required of bigger companies, but that move upset food safety advocates and larger growers.

Those exemptions are in the legislation Obama is signing.

Many major food companies also support the bill, recognizing that safe food is good for business.

The new law would:

—Allow the FDA to order a recall of tainted food. Currently it can only negotiate with businesses for voluntary recalls.

—Require the agency to develop new safety regulations for producers of the highest-risk fruits and vegetables.

—Increase inspections of domestic and foreign food facilities; the riskiest domestic facilities would be inspected every three years.

—Require farms and processors to keep records to help the government trace recalled foods.

The new law would not extend to meat, poultry or processed eggs. Those foods are regulated by the Agriculture Department and are subjected to more rigorous inspections and oversight than foods regulated by the FDA.